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The Scheme - Jerome Heights EP
Adam Able, Features Correspondent
image by Endless
Boasting artwork by graffiti artist Endless and a brand partnership with smiley.com, it is apparent that boyband The Scheme are aiming for an air of credibility. This is something that they nearly achieved with the beautifully choreographed music video for their 2015 single Dust. However, it is a dream that immediately flies out the window when anyone takes a closer look at their journey.

Unlike most upcoming boybands, The Scheme have clearly been around the block a few times ahead of reaching the release of their upcoming Jerome Heights; so the mistakes that are made throughout the four track EP are far less forgivable than for a band ten (or more) years younger than them taking their baby steps to success.

Now, we are all aware that a boyband is a formulaic process. Take good looking boys, style them and provide them with either instruments to pretend to play or a dodgy dance routine. When correctly assembled the end result can be truly impressive. The likes of Backstreet Boys, One Direction, N Sync, Take That, JLS and Boyzone all got it right in their own way. They fitted the mould but broke it just enough to give them some defining qualities that paved the way to international acclaim.

The Scheme have not managed the majority of the aforementioned tick list. They can sing, which is a start, but their sound is so generic and forgettable that it is hard to imagine standing through a set of their forgettable songs. From the Gary Barlow-lite of Somebody Else's Perfect to the wannabe-JLS bite of Socialite, they sadly miss the mark.

And worst of all they cheat their audience, promising a four track EP only to repeat the aforementioned attempt at Take That post-return alongside the better vocalled Lisa, who would have probably delivered a more exciting take had she done it solo.

While The Scheme started strong with Dust, disappointingly Jerome Heights doesn't excite or engage. The voices are there, maybe next time the material will be too. Back to the drawing board boys.

The Scheme - Jerome Heights EP, 14th October 2016, 13:30 PM