search
Barnsley
Batley
Bedale
Beverley
Bingley
Bradford
Bridlington
Brighouse
Castleford
Catterick Garrison
Cleckheaton
Cottingham
Darlington
Dewsbury
Doncaster
Driffield
Elland
Filey
Goole
Guisborough
Halifax
Harrogate
Hawes
Hebden Bridge
Heckmondwike
Hessle
Holmfirth
Huddersfield
Hull
Ilkley
Keighley
Knaresborough
Knottingley
Leeds
Leyburn
Liversedge
Malton
Mexborough
Middlesborough
Mirfield
Morley
Normanton
Northallerton
Ossett
Otley
Pickering
Pontetfract
Pudsey
Redcar
Richmond
Ripon
Rotherham
Saltburn-by-the-Sea
Scarborough
Selby
Settle
Sheffield
Shipley
Skipton
Sowerby Bridge
Stockton-on-Tees
Tadcaster
Thirsk
Todmorden
Wakefield
Wetherby
Whitby
Yarm
York
Tutti Frutti Go Wild At The Carriageworks
Richard Trinder, Editor
Rhys Warrington Molly Lopresti in WiLd! Photo by Brian Slater
As we celebrate 400 years of Shakespeare and we're Looking Back In Anger at John Osborne, it's perhaps a good time to remind ourselves what a powerful role theatre can play in society.

It can challenge history - sometimes re-write it, Mr Shakespeare - and it can change perceptions.

Evan Placey's Wild! is firmly in the 'changing perceptions' camp. It is an entertainment, certainly, but it is also an education. And like the best of lessons it is done with skill, subtlety and without preaching.

Wild! is the story of Billy, a child with Attention Defecit Hyperactivity Disorder - something of a mouthful and often shortened to ADHD.

Billy has friends but is struggling to keep them. His school can't cope with his hyper activity and sometimes excludes him - perhaps exacerbating his problem. His only true friends, other than his long-suffering Mum, are some bees. Sadly, even those are dead.

In a splendid performance, Rhys Warrington single-handedly creates the character of Billy. He has only a climbing frame, a small trampoline and a bee hive as props but, with the excellent musical assistance of Molly Lopresti, he walks us through Billy's day; his angers, his frustrations and the traumas of those close to him. Despite being alone on stage, the collateral damage around him is easy to see.

Rhys Warrington needs considerable energy for this part and, although early in his career, looked to me to have a touch of the young Eddy Redmayne about him.

Once again tutti frutti have brought a delightful, thought provoking education to the stage. It is educational, certainly, but not in the least preachy and well worth an hour of your time. Highly recommended.

Tutti Frutti Go Wild At The Carriageworks, 2nd May 2016, 11:54 AM