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The Death Of Bedtime Stories
photo by Neeta Lind
Recent research asked a total of 2,082 adults (with children 4-10 years old - 50% male/female ratio) how often they read their children a bedtime story. Shockingly, the research has shown that only 4% of parents read a bedtime story to their children every night. 61% stated they thought reading a story to their child every night was 'not very important.' 41% of parents stated that they never read to their children. When asked 'Why don't you read a bedtime story to your child or children every night?' a whopping 69% stated that they didn't have the time.

Sita Brand Founder and Director of Settle Stories comments:

'Modern family life is very busy, but it seems we are loosing perspective of what's important. Reading to children gives them a head start in life. It helps develop listening abilities, vocabulary, creativity and oral communication amongst many other critical skills.'

Settle Stories is an arts and heritage charity whose mission is to change the world through stories. They run the largest Storytelling Festival in the North of England and for the past 4 years have held a live event 'Bedtime Tales' as part of it. Children come in their pyjamas and with their favourite teddy in toe for stories.

photo by Gracie and Viv
Brand comments:

'Bedtime Tales is an opportunity for not only for the children to experience stories but for parents to see their children's eyes light up and their imaginations run wild - to see the power that stories have on their children.'

What are Settle Stories doing to change this statistic?

The audience for the Settle Storytelling Festival come from all over the country. Settle Stories want to ensure the magic of storytelling can continue for children at home wherever they are in the world. They strive for children from all backgrounds to have access to stories.

In December ten families from anywhere in the world will have the opportunity to participate in 'Bedtime Tales' a free online event that will inspire children into a world of faraway lands, other cultures and magic. Families will be able to take part from the comfort of their own home.

Settle Stories are conducting further research to identify the needs in their community. The research will establish what Settle Stories next move is. Their story is far from over, lets just hope they can bring back the magic of bedtime soon.

The Death Of Bedtime Stories, 26th November 2014, 14:35 PM