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Review: Walk The Moon
Jeremy Williams-Chalmers, Arts Correspondent
Walk The Moon
Named after The Police song Walking On The Moon, the Ohio quartet Walk The Moon have steadily built their name on the international stage since their 2010 single Anna Sun started hitting the radio waves.

Since then they have released one independent album release and two signed to a major label.

While both 2010's i want, i want and 2012's Walk The Moon impressed critics and saw them build their fanbase, it was 2014's Talking Is Hard that made them international contenders.

Three years on and the pressure is on for the band to deliver another slice of retro rock heaven.

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And they do not disappoint: The real appeal of Walk The Moon is in the punch, pouty and unpretentious playful pop rock. They know how to deliver a chorus that will have you chanting along and a melody that will have your hips manically shaking along.

Having delivered the earworm Shut Up and Dance to the world, they now offer the equally riotous Headphones and irrepressible One Foot. However the spacey Surrender shows that they can deliver a Bowie-esque smoocher without feeling like they are copying a tried and tested formula. It is this ability that ensures What If Nothing shines as brightly as its predecessors.

With the effortless shoulder shaker Tiger Teeth proving that their retro futuristic sonic explosion does not need to rely on obvious hooks that catch your heart, What If Nothing is a clear growth on the band's previous releases.

Throw into the mix the pop-soul dance anthem Can't Sleep (Wolves) and romper Kamikaze, which shows bands like the incessantly bland Maroon 5 that pop soul does not need to be generic or emotionless to succeed, and it is clear that Walk The Moon are destined to be bigger than they ever dreamed.

What If Nothing is an album that will to arena size success without losing the heart at the core of their appeal.

Review: Walk The Moon, 11th November 2017, 12:24 PM