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Celebrating World Book Night On An Epic Scale
This week, three storytellers from different cultures will descend on over 20 schools in Yorkshire. Sharing stories from around the world they will inspire over 1,500 children through interactive workshops and inspiring performances.

The tour celebrates the week of the annual international celebration 'World Book Night 2015.' North Yorkshire based Arts & Heritage charity Settle Stories are using this opportunity to touch the lives of over 1,500 children - sharing with them the fun of stories, encouraging them to tell their own and to read for pleasure.

Settle Stories aims to bring high class storytellers to rural audiences to share stories from different cultures. This tour will certainly do that.

Three highly acclaimed internationally known storytellers are taking part:

Alia Alzougbi who is a Lebanese storyteller that encourages pupils to explore their perceptions about racial differences.

Emily Hennessey who is a Swedish Storyteller, she uses Norse mythology to inspire children to create their own mythical worlds.

Githanda Githae who is a Kenyan storyteller will pass on African performance elements like chant, music and movement.

This tour is Settle Stories reaction to the latest curriculum which saw the removal of the spoken language strand from English. Storytellers across the country were concerned that their work in schools would stop. With former Minister of State Nick Gibb remarking that programmes looking at speech and language 'encourage idle chatter in the classroom' - Settle Stories founder and director Sita Brand, had to prove this reductive view wrong.

'This tour has proven to us that schools want storytellers in schools. Why? Because, it develops pupils' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and improves lifelong learning. It also teaches children about other cultures and widens horizons.'

This is the first of many storytelling tours Settle Stories plans to coordinate. Their next move will be to use storytelling to enhance learning in maths and science. So, this story is far from over. The schools and their pupils certainly don't want it to be.

For more information please go to www.settlestories.org.uk

Celebrating World Book Night On An Epic Scale, 20th April 2015, 14:35 PM